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    UNSUNG BRONZEVILLE: CULTURAL INCUBATOR OF SOUND

    THROUGH JUNE 30

    As Chicago prepares to kick off its annual Blues Fest,
    Harold Washington College’s 11th Floor Gallery is presenting an exhibit of archival
    photographs curated by the Chicago Blues Museum called Unsung Bronzeville—Cultural
    Incubator of Sound, which provides a glimpse into the beginnings of popular music in
    Chicago.

    WE BRING YOU BRONZEVILLE: PIONEERS OF BLACK MUSIC

    PERMANENT/SEMI-PERMANENT

    "Pioneers of Black Music”, part of the museum’s “Unsung Bronzeville” series, documents the
    cultural legacy of the historic district, and how it served as a rich cultural incubator in the
    emergence of Chicago as a birthplace of electric blues, jazz and R&B music, shaping the
    evolution of American Popular music. The Chicago Blues Museum’s archival photographic images
    focus on Chicago musicians, entertainers, homegrown talent and famous residents, as well as on
    the places and companies where this popular music originated and evolved.

    UNSUNG BRONZEVILLE - FROM THE STROLL TO LAKE MEADOWS

    THROUGH FEBRUARY 2020

    The city of Chicago’s first Culver’s, located at 3355 South Martin Luther King
    Drive in the Bronzeville neighborhood, will mark ‘Black History Month’ this February with “Unsung
    Bronzeville—From the Stroll to Lake Meadows” that blends the cultural significance of the local community
    along with its historical roots to the music industry.

    As a most-fitting tribute to Black History Month, Culver’s guests will have the opportunity to explore the
    significant contributions from musicians, artists, and citizens to the fabric of the historic South Side district 's
    deep cultural history in blues, soul and jazz. “Although we’re not a location where you would expect to find a
    music exhibit of this kind, we felt it important to honor the legacy of the community we serve and all of those
    who helped stamp their place in black history,” said Waller.

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